By Matthew Rothschild on February 20, 2014

In the first John Doe investigation, the prosecutors were hot on Scott Walker's trail.

The chief investigator of the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office, David Budde, testified on November 1, 2010, that Walker himself, as Milwaukee county executive, was illegally using the private communication system that his staff had set up.

Budde was asked under oath: "Did you find any e-mails written by the County Executive himself" on "personal laptops in the County Executive's Office?"

Budde answered with one word: "Yes."

In his testimony, Budde offered several examples.

Example #1: On March 17, 2010, at 2:21 p.m. Central Time, an e-mail came in "to Scott Walker at a non-county e-mail address." It was copied to several of his top aides "all at private e-mail addresses." Then there was an e-mail directly "from Walker replying to the same people." The e-mail exchange dealt with an appearance by his opponent, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett at an event held by the company Air Tran. Walker minimized the importance of the event, saying "Air Tran is just having a job fair."

Example #2: On October 18, 2010, at 3:41 p.m. Walker received an e-mail from Fran McLaughlin, the county communications director, that was sent not from her county e-mail but from her own one. Irony alert: That e-mail included a phrase that the Walker staff had worked on, which said, "Fortunately, for Milwaukee County citizens, Scott Walker has decided that government in secret is not in the best interest of taxpayers."

Photo: "Businessman with a secret," via Shutterstock.

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A plea to United States citizens to work for peace

An Indian journalist globally renowned as an advocate for the poor, Palagummi Sainath detailed the detrimental...

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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