Real leaders need to lead a push back against the firestorm of fear about Muslims—not fan the flames.

Ed Schultz had crowd members cheering enthusiastically several times at Fighting Bob Fest 2015 Saturday September 19th, but he had them on their feet when he came out with his first public endorsement of Bernie Sanders run for the Democratic nomination. 

"He does all these things that aren't supposed to work, like not take PAC money, not run negative campaigns, or make personal attacks, but all of a sudden he's kinda winnin'," said Schultz. Schultz said he planned to spend time traveling to help boost Sanders' run.


Photo by Tim Leahy

"Instead of thinking who is liberal and who is conservative, you look at it vertically and ask who is on top and who is at the bottom..." —Mike McCabe

"The Desperado."


1. A yearbook photo of Walker as a high school senior in Delavan, Wisconsin, bears the caption, “Scott K. Walker - the Desperado.” He says the yearbook editor, a friend, ran this as a joke because “I was unshaven, in that particular picture.”

For four years, until recently, I wrote a weekly column that ran in newspapers across Wisconsin. It was called “Money & Politics,” and it dealt with campaign financing, elections, lobbying and ethics.

My beat, in other words, was essentially the same as that of the Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. And it brought me into frequent contact with that agency’s leadership and staff.

As their reaction to the Iran nuclear agreement shows, the GOP presidential candidates have similarly belligerent attitudes on international issues.

For the last several years, The Progressive has covered Scott Walker’s reversal of Wisconsin’s progressive legacy. The Republican governor, elected in 2010, set out to divide and conquer the state with his own brand of anti-public-interest politics.


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This time we’ve got some advantages.


We need to improve the condition of workers this Thanksgiving weekend. Here's what you can do.

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.

Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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