Trumbo” is a rarity: A Hollywood movie with a heroic lead identified as a Communist. Dalton Trumbo was reputedly postwar Hollywood’s highest paid screenwriter, with such scripts under his belt as 1940’s class conscious “Kitty Foyle,” for which Ginger Rogers won a Best Actress Oscar, and World War II morale boosters like “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo” starring Spencer Tracy. But to keep this prestigious, well-paying job, as Dalton is warned by MGM’s mogul Louis B. Mayer (Richard Portnow), he best avoid politics.  


Cate Blanchett in "Carol." Photo courtesy ZFF.

Progressives will find a lot to love among the 161 movies from 33 countries shown at the 11th annual Zürich Film Festival.


With more brutal killings and mysterious deaths while in police custody, it seems hardly a day goes by without a new dashboard camera video or protest calling out for justice. As these tragedies keep happening, I thought it might be helpful to look at our predicament from a few billion miles away.

Photo: "Consumed" Promotional Picture

“Consumed” is an environmentally-themed movie featuring Zoe Lister-Jones as a single midwestern mom, waitress and student who discovers that genetically modified organisms are making her son sick.


Folk singer Ronnie Gilbert died earlier this week. Gilbert, 88, was a founding member of the Weavers along with Pete Seeger, Fred Hellerman and Lee Hays. She was the band's sole female member. She started performing in the 1940s, and her political voice was still being heard in the 2000s.


Still from film of Becca Blackwell as Dylan

Dylan, a new short film by Emmy award-winning filmmaker director Elizabeth Rohrbaugh based on her interviews with childhood friend Dylan Winn Garner, aims to show transgender kids that they're not alone.


Subscribe to Culture


Subscribe to The Progressive

This time we’ve got some advantages.

We need to improve the condition of workers this Thanksgiving weekend. Here's what you can do.

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.

Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

Public School Shakedown

Progressive Media Project