Barbara Ransby

Celebrate King not just for civil rights but also for antiwar activism

Celebrate King not just for civil rights but also for antiwar activism
By Barbara Ransby

January 9, 2007

This Martin Luther King Jr. Day, as American deaths in Iraq exceed 3,000 and Iraqi casualties climb into the hundreds of thousands, we need to remember King's words of wisdom about the perils of war.

Lunch-counter sit-ins were watershed in civil rights movement

Lunch-counter sit-ins were watershed in civil rights movement
By Barbara Ransby

January 27, 2005

Feb. 1, 1960, is a watershed in the history of the modern civil rights movement. Forty-five years ago on this date, a handful of black students decided to disrupt business-as-usual in the segregated South. They marched, ever so respectfully, into a local drugstore in Greensboro, N.C., and sat at the lunch-counter designated -- by custom and law -- for whites only.

Edwards sheds the legacy of the South

Edwards sheds the legacy of the South
By Barbara Ransby

July 8, 2004

The selection of John Edwards as the Democratic vice presidential candidate is promising for African-Americans, but he should not be given a free pass. Edwards is a white Southerner from working-class roots who grew up in the 1960s surrounded by the foment of the civil-rights movement. The Democratic Party that Edwards entered decades later was different from the one that housed racist Southern Democrats like Sen.

Like Chicago's first black mayor, Obama could break barriers

Like Chicago's first black mayor, Obama could break barriers
By Barbara Ransby

March 24, 2004

A little more than 20 years ago, Chicagoans mobilized across lines of race, class, language and neighborhood to elect the city's first black mayor, Harold Washington. On March 16, a diverse statewide coalition delivered another decisive victory, this time to the candidate who could integrate the U.S.

Race, rape and the legacy of the South

Race, rape and the legacy of the South
By Barbara Ransby

December 23, 2003

It's a new story and an old story. The fact that racist segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond engaged in the kind of "race-mixing" privately that he condemned publicly is not much of a surprise. The flurry of media coverage around the recent announcement by Essie Mae Washington-Williams that Thurmond was her biological father has danced rather timidly around some of the more sordid implications of this revelation.

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