Stephen C. Webster

<span class="floatleft"><img src="http://www.progressive.org/images/staff/stephenwebstermugshot.gif" width="70" ></span>Stephen C. Webster is The Progressive's web editor and director of our online operations. He previously spent five years as senior editor for The Raw Story, helping to grow the publication from 50,000 monthly readers to a 5 million reader powerhouse. His work has been cited in publications like The Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Think Progress, Wired and Time, among others. Before making it in the national press, Webster put in four years with The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, then moved on to The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly and Austin Monthly. He joined The Progressive in 2013. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/stephencwebster">@StephenCWebster.</a><br>

By Stephen C. Webster on February 26, 2014

A federal judge in San Antonio ruled Wednesday (PDF) that the same sex marriage ban in Texas violates the Constitution by depriving the LGBT community of equal protection under the law.

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By Stephen C. Webster on February 25, 2014

A short film released Tuesday by the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) dissects the oil industry's claims of how America will benefit from the Keystone XL project.

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By Stephen C. Webster on February 24, 2014

Just how bad is it getting for embattled Governor Scott Walker? Bad enough that he spent Sunday morning refusing to answer softball questions from Fox News and making excuses for why he's ducking the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC).

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By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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