Stories by contributor

Our nation may miss the true spirit of the season if we do not acknowledge that the Christ child had much in common with millions of American working families who find affordable housing out of reach.

While many in our nation are celebrating economic growth, a stable unemployment rate and macroeconomic stability, too many folks find that there is no room at the inn called affordable housing.

Section: 

Conservative Christian groups are waging war against corporations that don't pass the litmus test of their extreme right-wing agendas.

Most recently, these groups have targeted such businesses as the Ford Motor Company, American Girl dolls and Wells Fargo bank.

Donald Wildmon's American Family Association has been going after Ford since 2002, demanding that the company stop advertising on "Will & Grace" and other gay-friendly television shows.

Section: 

With seven Golden Globe nominations and several Oscar nods surely to follow, "Brokeback Mountain" is a must-see.

This groundbreaking film challenges assumptions and shatters stereotypes. It is about two young men trying to get by, who pass the time while their emerging friendship takes a turn for the unexpected.

There are no explosions, mysterious murders or typical Hollywood drama. Just two men, alone in the world, searching for companionship and camaraderie.

Section: 

It is fitting that Vine Deloria Jr.'s spirit chose to pass on Nov. 13, so close to Thanksgiving.

Section: 

A Surgeon’s Touch
By Howard Zinn

September 2005 Issue

As I write this, the frightening violence in Iraq continues, England and the United States are in a state of fear about suicide bombs, and the Senate is about to confirm a new, conservative Supreme Court justice. So it may seem peculiar to bring up a subject that is either at the far edge of all our attention, or over the edge and invisible. But here I go.

Section: 

Why I'm Camping Out in Crawford
Cindy Sheehan

August 18, 2005

I will never, ever forget the night of April 4, 2004, when I found out that my son Casey had been killed in Iraq.

Section: 

Why I'm Camping Out in Crawford
Cindy Sheehan

August 18, 2005

I will never, ever forget the night of April 4, 2004, when I found out that my son Casey had been killed in Iraq.

Section: 

Gagging Workers off the Job
By Matthew Rothschild

August 16, 2005

Noam Chomsky likes to refer to corporations as dictatorships, and while that might seem a little strong, your rights as an employee are few and far between.

Section: 

Watching Torture in Prime Time
By Anne-Marie Cusac

From the August 2005 Issue

In the same week as the one-year anniversary of Abu Ghraib, an episode of the Fox hit show 24 opened with a scene of the Counter Terrorism Unit medical clinic. Lying in a hospital bed, attended to by physicians, was the terrorism suspect who, in the last seconds of the previous episode, had screamed as the show’s hero, Jack Bauer, broke the bones in his hand.

Section: 

Hybrid vehicles are at the crossroads
By Michelle Robinson

August 11, 2005

Imagine the public outrage if it were discovered that Philip Morris developed a cure for cancer but used it to merely make cigarettes taste better. While that is fictional, something very similar, and very real, may be happening to hybrid vehicles.

Section: 

Topics: 

Pages

More

Subscribe to The Progressive

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).


Public School Shakedown

Progressive Media Project

Newsletter