By Anonymous (not verified) on May 21, 2012

Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio is finally being called to task.

The Department of Justice’s lawsuit against “America’s toughest sheriff” alleges that he and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Department “intentionally and systematically discriminate against Latinos.”

It says they use “unconstitutional law enforcement actions against Latinos who are frequently stopped, detained and arrested on the basis of race, color or national origin.” It also says they use “discriminatory jail practices against Latino inmates with limited English skills.”

Arpaio has openly mocked the attempts to rein in his department’s out-of-control behavior. And he has become a rallying cry for those seeking to scapegoat Latinos. The support he boasts spreads far beyond the boundaries of Maricopa County. The majority of financial contributions he receives come from out of state, according to The Associated Press.

The Department of Justice accused Arpaio of abusing power. It offered a settlement agreement if the sheriff agreed to institute reforms. Arpaio refused.

As citizens, we cannot afford to allow officials like Arpaio to think they are above reproach for their actions. We cannot allow the kinds of cruelties his department is accused of to go unchecked.

For the residents of Maricopa County — and for Latinos and good-hearted people around the country — the Justice Department lawsuit is a welcome intervention.

Jose Miguel Leyva is a freelance writer and journalist living in El Paso, Texas. He can be reached at pmproj@progressive.org.

You can read more pieces from The Progressive Media Project by clicking here.

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By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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