By The Progressive on August 21, 2008

SELECT A YEAR: 2009   2008   2007   2006

December 2007 Volume 71, Number 12

Comment A New Food System

Barbara Ehrenreich is having a hard time staying awake during this Presidential campaign.

Luis J. Rodríguezdenounces military recruitment in the barrio.

Ruth Conniff follows the Hillary Clinton money trail.

Is Bill Richardson Radioactive? by Laura Paskus
The candidate’s record as governor raises questions.

Less Than Human by Edwidge Danticat
“My uncle and many of the others who have died and are dying in the custody of the Department of Homeland Security and I.C.E officials did not violate any immigration laws.”

Poem by Wendell Berry

Will Durst says it’s impossible to be wronger than George W. Bush.

November 2007 Volume 71, Number 11

Comment Blackwater’s Black Eye

Barbara Ehrenreich wants to crush the health insurance companies.

Luis J. Rodríguezmakes the case for the healing power of poetry.

Sitting This One Out by Adolph L. Reed Jr.
“I’m not going to acquiesce in the fiction that the Presidential charade has any credibility whatsoever.”

Feminists Reread the Quran by Anjuman Ali
Scholars interpret the Muslim holy book from a pro-woman perspective.

Kucinich’s Challenge by John Nichols
If the peace candidate would stop pretending he’ll be the next President, he might push the Democrats in a positive direction.

Dave Eggers by Nina Siegal
“There hasn’t been an Administration as disastrous as Bush’s in American history,” says the bestselling author. “I’ve been reading Presidential biographies lately and I haven’t been able to find any worse Administration, nothing comparably bad on so many levels.”

Poem by Judith Hall

Kate Clinton catches ex-officials doing unearned victory laps.

August 2007 Volume 71, Number 10

CommentBush’s Iran War Plans

Barbara Ehrenreich roposes a better way to teach abstinence.

Eduardo Galeano interprets the curse of Columbus Day.

In the Feminist Fast Lane byLaura S. Washington
Loretta Ross travels at warp speed to promote a “pro-sex” agenda.

Mandela at Sunset by Andrew Meldrum
The living legend is keeping busy in retirement.

Representative Barbara Lee by Andrea Lewis
“The longer we stay in Iraq, the worse it’s going to get. We have to remember: We’re digging ourselves deeper in a hole by staying there,” says the California Congresswoman.

Poem by Andrena Zawinski

Will Durst peddles a Republicans Gone Wild DVD.

September 2007 Volume 71, Number 9

Comment Watch Those Executive Orders

Barbara Ehrenreich debunks the received wisdom on cancer.

Matthew Rothschild goes over a White House manual on how to silence protesters.

Ruth Conniff surveys the impeachment landscape.

Separated by Law by Vince Beiser
The new immigration service’s aggressive deportation policy is taking a toll on families.

Junot Diaz by Juleyka Lantigu
“The U.S. that I had imagined was nowhere near as crazy and as incredibly damaging and brutal and indifferent as the U.S. that we’re currently living in,” says the fiction writer.

Poem by Kevin Young

Michael Feldmaneavesdrops on a Bush-Maliki conversation about God.

August 2007 Volume 71, Number 8

Comment Cheney’s Fingerprints

Barbara Ehrenreich weighs the bloated overclass.

Matthew Rothschild talks to a poet deemed unworthy.

Bush Reneges on Housing Pledge by Susan Sturgis
To look at what happened to the homesteading initiative is to see writ small the larger dysfunctions that have stymied efforts to rebuild.

Gambling with Biloxi Tim Shorrock
Casinos come first, while residents are left to fight for their homes and neighborhoods.

Rats’ Alley Brian Gilmore
On a visit to New Orleans, you’re never ready to see a neighborhood that is dead and gone.

Elizabeth Edwards by Ruth Conniff
“What makes the other candidates get up in the morning and want to do this?” The wife of John Edwards asks if they have a vision beyond themselves.

Poem by Rachel Hadas

Will Durst calls Cheney a shark with glasses.

May 2007 Volume 71, Number 5

CommentMortgage Vultures

Ruth Conniff watches Al Gore go one way and Ralph Nader the other.

Matthew Rothschild tracks the case of a Bolivian scholar denied a visa.

Howard Zinn urges us to act like citizens, not politicians.

Labor Offers Business Health Care Cures by Barbara Miner
Why Andy Stern and Wal-Mart are joining hands.

Poem by Kathleen Aguero

Manu Chao, Globalista by Antonino D’Ambrosio
“I just don’t understand why there aren’t thousands protesting outside the White House every day,” says the polyglot musician.

AIDS Activist Turns South Africa Around Andrew Meldrum
How Zackie Achmat changed AIDS policy at the epicenter of the global epidemic.

Barbara Ehrenreich divines the meaning of The Secret.

June 2007 Volume 71, Number 6

Comment Shun Colombia

Barbara Ehrenreich spies Wal-Mart’s surveillance tactics.

Ruth Conniff watches Obama throw away his script and contend with Virginia Tech.

Howard Zinn eulogizes his friend Kurt Vonnegut.

The Army Goes on Spring Break by Kirk Nielsen
Enticing half-naked college kids to look up from their beer guzzling and beanbag tossing and contemplate enlistment.

Maverick Mike Gravel by Joe Lauria
For the former Senator from Alaska, opposing a foolish war is nothing new.

Joschka Fischer by Amitabh Pal
Any U.S. military action against Iran “would lead the whole region into a very, very deep and dark hole,” says Germany’s former foreign minister and Green Party leader.

Poem by Dennis Trudell

Barbara Ehrenreich divines the meaning of The Secret.

May 2007 Volume 71, Number 5

CommentMortgage Vultures

Ruth Conniff watches Al Gore go one way and Ralph Nader the other.

Matthew Rothschild tracks the case of a Bolivian scholar denied a visa.

Howard Zinn urges us to act like citizens, not politicians.

Labor Offers Business Health Care Cures by Barbara Miner
Why Andy Stern and Wal-Mart are joining hands.

Poem by Kathleen Aguero

Manu Chao, Globalista by Antonino D’Ambrosio
“I just don’t understand why there aren’t thousands protesting outside the White House every day,” says the polyglot musician.

AIDS Activist Turns South Africa Around Andrew Meldrum
How Zackie Achmat changed AIDS policy at the epicenter of the global epidemic.

Barbara Ehrenreich divines the meaning of The Secret.

April 2007 Volume 71, Number 4

Comment Iran in the Cross Hairs

Why Hillary Is Not the One by Cindy Sheehan
I will only support a candidate who is courageously and uncompromisingly committed to peace.

Ruth Conniff watches Al Franken transition to pol.

Luis J. Rodríguez issues a call for black-brown unity.

Why Hillary Is Not the One by Cindy Sheehan
I will only support a candidate who is courageously and uncompromisingly committed to peace.

Is Obama One of Us? by Salim Muwakkil
He’s a progressive in the context of Washington. It’s up to us to widen that context.

China Joins the Battle for Space by Frida Berrigan
Its test only emboldened the hardcore advocates of missile defense in the United States.

“The People Are Sovereign” by Senator Russ Feingold

“If and when Congress acts on the will of the American people by ending our involvement in the Iraq War, Congress will be performing the role assigned it by the Founding Fathers.”

Lewis Black by Antonino D’Ambrosio
“Every day these guys do something more outrageous. I just start yelling about this stuff, and there is my act,” says the comedian.

Poem by Matthew Murrey

Manu Chao, Globalista by Antonino D’Ambrosio
“I just don’t understand why there aren’t thousands protesting outside the White House every day,” says the polyglot musician.

Will Durst overs Presidential spring training.

March 2007 Volume 71, Number 3

Comment Molly Ivins in Her Own Words

Matthew Rothschild investigates a case of preventive detention.

Barbara Ehrenreich weighs in on the etiquette of big tipping.

Held Without Trial in the USA by A. C. Thompson
Why a national grassroots campaign is needed to impeach Bush and Cheney.

Broken by This War by Stacy Bannerman
“Almost 60,000 military marriages have been broken by the war.

Gene Sharp by Gene Sharp
“Dictators don’t like us,” says the leading advocate of nonviolent action.

Poem by Adrienne Rich

Manu Chao, Globalista by Antonino D’Ambrosio
“I just don’t understand why there aren’t thousands protesting outside the White House every day,” says the polyglot musician.

Kate Clinton examines the body politic.

Molly Ivins said it’s time to raise hell.

February 2007 Volume 71, Number 2

Comment Bush’s Undemocratic Escalation

Barbara Ehrenreich cheers Borat and deplores routine American anti-Semitism.

Luis J. Rodríguez welcomes back Daniel Ortega.

Impeachment by the People by Howard Zinn
Why a national grassroots campaign is needed to impeach Bush and Cheney.

Graduating to Prison: Native Americans Sue School District by Mary Annette Pember
About 30 percent of elementary students in Winner, South Dakota, are Native American. Only 1 percent finishes high school.

Iraq Disintegrates by David Enders
“Three people passed by me and shot another man in the head and walked away. It’s just normal.”

Linton Kwesi Johnson by Elizabeth DiNovella
“People know me as a reggae artist; they don’t know me as a poet,” says the British performer. “But I began with the word.”

Poem by Frederick Foote

Mark Cuban is a political work-in-progress.

Molly Ivins hails some Bill of Rights heroes.

January 2007 Volume 71, Number 1

Comment Our Sinful Economy

Barbara Ehrenreich detects the can’t-do spirit of the Dems.

A Peculiar Version of Friendly Fire: Female Troops Face Double Danger by Traci Hukill
Sexual harassment and assault are endemic in the military.

Homecoming Nightmares Elizabeth Weill-Greenberg
For many veterans of the Iraq War, everyday noises, sights, and smells are deadly threats.

A School in Coal’s Shadow by Kari Lydersen
Massey Energy operates right above a West Virginia elementary school, where the kids are already getting sick.

Blanket Immunity: Bush Twists Arms to Evade Court by Amitabh Pal
The Bush Administration’s campaign to get exempted from the International Criminal Court has run into some resistance.

Frank Rich by Paul VanDeCarr
“Even before 9/11, we saw signs of a Presidency that was inclined to fictionalize almost everything,” says the New York Times columnist.

Poem by Minnie Bruce Pratt

The Mavericks’ Maverick by Dave Zirin
Mark Cuban is a political work-in-progress.

Molly Ivins thanks conservatives for all the fun they’ve provided since Election Day.

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By Ruth Conniff

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Here, for Labor Day, are the top ten working class hero movies of all time.

At a swank club in Madison, Walker supporters get an earful.

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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