Amitabh Pal

Amitabh Pal is the Managing Editor of The Progressive. He has interviewed the Dalai Lama, Mikhail Gorbachev, Jimmy Carter and John Kenneth Galbraith for the magazine. In addition to his role as the Managing Editor, Pal is the Co-Editor of the Progressive Media Project.
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By Amitabh Pal on July 09, 2013

The Pakistani government's official inquiry into the killing of Osama bin Laden makes for interesting reading. Leaked to Al Jazeera, it sheds some unflattering light on Pakistan's involvement with extremists.

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By Amitabh Pal on July 03, 2013

With Nelson Mandela's illness and President Obama's recent South Africa visit, it is a good time to assess the impact of Mahatma Gandhi on the South African icon.

"As he toured Robben Island [where Mandela was imprisoned] with his family, Obama was looking back at the legacy of others," the L.A. Times reports. "As he stood in the quarry, he was heard telling his daughters, Sasha and Malia, about Mahatma Gandhi's early work in South Africa as a lawyer."

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By Amitabh Pal on June 28, 2013

The government of Ecuador won't be bullied by Washington.

U.S. officials and members of Congress had been threatening to take away the South American country's trade privileges if it granted Edward Snowden asylum. "Our government will not reward countries for bad behavior," Senator Robert Menendez, the head of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had said.

The Ecuadorian government has decided to call the American bluff by unilaterally canceling its trade deal with the United States.

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Dubbed “Ferguson to Madison,” the rally drew striking social parallels between the two cities.

Every 28 hours, a black person is killed by the police in the United States.

Darren Wilson is free to go back to his job policing the citizens of Ferguson, if he wants. Michael Brown is dead...

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

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