By Anonymous (not verified) on January 08, 2013

On New Year’s Eve, my partner and I had the pleasure of attending Jim Hormel’s 80th birthday party here in New York. I met his family – children, grandchildren, great-grand-children. His family of friends was there from Minnesota, California, Germany and us from Manhattan’s Upper West Side. His fellow LGBT activists and philanthropists were there to celebrate his eighty years.

Jim has a wicked sense of humor, but I was surprised and honored to find myself seated next to him. Over a lovely arugula salad, he said that because of the holidays he hadn’t paid much attention to the news, so was amused to find himself in the limelight again with the nomination of Chuck Hagel to head the Department of Defense.

During Jim’s long fight to become ambassador to Luxembourg, described in excruciating detail in his new memoir Fit to Serve [Skyhorse Publishing], Hagel had objected to the nomination because Jim was “openly, aggressively gay.” Jim said that Hagel had apologized to him recently. I said, “But you were openly, aggressively gay, thank you very much.” He laughed. He’d had to be.

If you liked this article by Kate Clinton, a columnist for The Progressive magazine, check out some of her other pieces by clicking here.

Add new comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.

More

 

By Jessica Mason and Matthew Rothschild

Thursday afternoon, a group of 75 Wisconsin...

By Kathi Wolfe
President Obama signed an executive order on July 21 prohibiting federal contractors from...

The Obama Administration has given the go-ahead to a massive new oil exploration program off the Atlantic coast....

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).

Public School Shakedown

Progressive Media Project

Newsletter

Get Breaking News and Alerts!